Situated on the front of the Hue Imperial City, the Noon Gate was constructed in 1833 and reserved for the Emperor. It was also used as a tribune for Court regular and irregular festive occasions such as the Calendar Distribution Ceremony, Proclamation Ceremony of successful candidates in national examinations, Troops Parade, etc.

To fulfill these two functions, Noon Gate is divided into two parts, the foundation and the Five-Phoenix Pavilion. Both are U-shaped, symbolizing arms open for guests.

Hue Imperial City has five entrances. The middle is reserved for the Emperor, four side – entrances for other participants in the royal procession including elephants and horses.

The Five-Phoenix Pavilion has two stages. The top is formed by nine roofs. The middle roof, covered with yellow (colour used by the Emperor only) enameled tiles, shelters the monarch in ceremonious occasions. Eight side-roofs, covered with green enameled tiles, are seats for other members of the Court.

The pavilion is supported by 100 columns. According to Oriental concepts, 100 is an infinite and countless number.

Constructors of the Noon Gate appeared to be so good at designing, decorating and calculating the durability that, for almost 200 years, it has remained in good condition and is considered the most typical art symbol of the ancient Hue. the durability that, for almost 200 years, it has remained in good condition and is considered the most typical art symbol of the ancient Hue city.

Noon Gate in Hue imperial city
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